Sustainable Living

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I define a “sustainable lifestyle” as one that is regenerative for ourselves, our families and communities, and our ecosystems. Everything is connected; good health for any one of these elements relies on good health for all of them.


Introduction

We must do the work ourselveshere and nowin our own kitchens, gardens and communities.

If you are reading this, most likely you're at least a little concerned about the trajectory that we humans are on. Maybe, like me, there are moments when you are terrified about it. 

We're living in a house of cards. 

We are outsourcing our needs to production methods that deplete our atmosphere, soils, water, ecosystems, and communities, and that are reliant on rapidly shrinking reserves of fossil fuels.

The apparent affluence on the shelves of supermarkets and superstores is part of an illusionThe idea that you can afford to care more about the model of car you drive than about what's happening in the world around you, is part of an illusion. They are part of a collective lack of awareness that something has gone very, very wrong. 

At the risk of stating the obvious, something needs to change.

Exactly what needs to change, how it should change, and who should do the work, are topics that continue to be flogged to death in discussions at every level, but discussion is much more valuable and productive if we also take action. 

Small actions are best, that we can learn from, that we can build on. Action at a level that we can sustain. 

And since governments, institutions, and corporations are too busy squabbling over details and profit margins to take meaningful action, its up to us to get on with the job.

Hope is a verb with its sleeves rolled up."

David Orr

Its up to us, in our own kitchens, gardens, and communities. Here and now. To get on with providing for ourselves and living in ways that regenerate, rather than depleting, the web of life we rely on.

This topicSustainable Livingis all about getting on with it. 


Sustainable Living Post Collections

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Posts often appear in more than one collection.

Real Food and Regenerative Agriculture

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Food was once something that people shared with each other. In societies fed by industrial agriculture, food is now a commodity, traded globally and anonymously. This commodified food does not build health for those who eat it, and it erodes the health of food growing families, communities and ecosystems.

I define "Real Food" as food that attempts to repair these broken connections and rebuild health on all these levels. Real food is not just healthy for the eater, but also for the grower and for our living planet. 

Real Food and "Regenerative Agriculture" go together. You can't have one without the other. To me, Regenerative Agriculture is any system or philosophy of agriculture or gardening that seeks to build soils, care for ecology, and increase biodiversity as side effects of growing food and other things people need. In short, it regenerates and enriches the ecosystem it's embedded in, rather than degrading it. 

Many of the posts in this collection appear in other collections also.

Supermarket Food is Like a Tiger in a Zoo This post is about a 2 minute readReal food is more expensive than supermarket food if you measure only in dollars. But here’s the thing: if you can measure its value in dollars, it’s not really real food. The value of food was never meant to be

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Assuming you’re eating the healthiest plant foods, grown in the healthiest soil, that you can find or afford, what else can you do to increase your mineral intake without using pills?

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Minerals are ​essential to life, but they’ve become dramatically less available to us in the food we eat. This article explores why.

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Wild edibles (aka weeds) provide better nutrition than supermarkets ever can, for free.

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Will this Type of Agriculture Feed Your Grandchildren?

In any truly regenerative style of agriculture, the harvest is a side-effect of ecosystem regeneration and vice versa – ecosystem regeneration is a side-effect of the efforts to produce a harvest.

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6 ​Plants that can handle heat and high humidity and that you can put in a salad ​without alienating salad eaters.​The 7th plant, very small in stature and not fitting the tropical perennial profile, none-the-less makes a super-sized contribution to the salad bowl.

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Home Grown Food and Animal Fodder

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We grow most of our vegetables, all of our salad greens, and a small but increasing amount of our other plant food needs. 

We also seek to grow as much of our own animal fodder as we can, because if we're relying on feed stores to enable us to raise our own meat, milk, and eggs then we're still dependent on Industrialized Agriculture.

We're inspired by Permaculture, Syntropics, and all  Regnerative Agriculture philosophies and techniques, because these seek to create stable, diverse, resilient ecosystems in which food production occurs as a byproduct of ecoystem health (or vice-versa) rather than at the expense of it.

This post collection includes profiles of individual plants, what we're learning as we go along, and discussions about the methods we're inspired by.

Okinawa spinach is an edible, nutritious, prolific, and low maintenance ground covering plant. It looks good enough to landscape with. And the more you eat it, the better it looks.

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Stinging nettle has a long ​history of use ​for ​food, medicine, cordage, and dye. Here are some ideas ​for ​​making use of the ​free food and fertilizer ​that this under-appreciated weed has to offer.

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About ​how the ginger ​growing in ​our garden has inspired successful homemade sauerkraut in ​our kitchen, which in turn has inspired better maintenance of the ginger plants in ​the garden. Sauerkraut recipe included.

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Queensland arrowroot ​(Cana edulis) provides food for us, food for chickens, pigs, cattle and goats, mulch and/or compost material, and shelter for other plants. It’s super easy to grow and to harvest and it self-propagates to a certain extent but is not weedy or invasive. And I think it looks beautiful. What more could a polyculture food grower ask?

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The best way to have healthy, happy chickens is to integrate them tightly into a thriving, bustling ecosystem that benefits from their presence, rather than allowing them to spread out in a sparse ecosystem that they steadily ​degrade because it is unable to support them.

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Deep litter bedding for chickens approximates the forest floor environment they evolved in, builds their health, provides them with entertainment, and captures fertility for soil building. Here is why we decided to try confinement on deep litter with no outside foraging.

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Chickens for eggs, meat, soil building, and entertainment

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The best way to have healthy, happy chickens is to integrate them tightly into a thriving, bustling ecosystem that benefits from their presence, rather than allowing them to spread out in a sparse ecosystem that they steadily ​degrade because it is unable to support them.

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Deep litter bedding for chickens approximates the forest floor environment they evolved in, builds their health, provides them with entertainment, and captures fertility for soil building. Here is why we decided to try confinement on deep litter with no outside foraging.

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Well-managed chickens can provide eggs and meat as well as composting assistance, pest reduction, soil amendment services and entertainment. But they can also be incredibly destructive, as you know if you’ve had garden beds dug up or fruit trees de-mulched.

How do we harness all that chickens offer, in ways that keep everybody happy, healthy and productive?

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This post shares the funny things one of our roosters gets up to, and it concludes the Backyard Chicken Series with the question, “Can good husbandry, regenerative agriculture, and morally right living, be defined in terms of happiness and connection?”

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Doesn’t happiness – even “just” the happiness of some hen in a backyard hen house somewhere, count towards a more whole, more beautiful world, a world that has a little more rightness about it?

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Why our efforts to address ecological destruction aren’t working yet, and how backyard chickens (or any other living thing that you care for) can help.

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In traditional cultures, organ meats were considered to be the animals’ most nutritious, most precious, gift to humanity. In modern society, we’re repelled by the idea of eating organ meats. What happened?

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“Happy meat” comes from animals raised in ecosystems, not cages. What if you can’t raise your own animals? Can you still eat happy meat? What if you’ve chosen a vegetarian lifestyle to protect animals from exploitation?

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What we have (so far) found to be the pros and cons of mobile versus stationary pig raising systems, and why we are currently trailing a stationary arrangement for our pigs.

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Why we buy piglets rather than breeding our own; preparing for their arrival and minimizing the stress of their transition; what to feed them; a few thoughts on choosing heritage breeds versus modern breeds.

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Electric fencing works very effectively for pigs, but only if they get the right first impressions of it. Here are the steps we take to train our piglets to stay behind electric fences, without terrifying them in the process.

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Well-managed chickens can provide eggs and meat as well as composting assistance, pest reduction, soil amendment services and entertainment. But they can also be incredibly destructive, as you know if you’ve had garden beds dug up or fruit trees de-mulched.

How do we harness all that chickens offer, in ways that keep everybody happy, healthy and productive?

More...

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Raising Pigs 

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This post collection shares what we've learned so far in our efforts to:

  • raise healthy, homegrown pork from happy pigs for our own use 
  • keep the enjoyment in raising pigs rather than have it turn into just another daily chore
  • ensure that the environment we raise the pigs in benefits from their presence rather than being impoverished by them


What we have (so far) found to be the pros and cons of mobile versus stationary pig raising systems, and why we are currently trailing a stationary arrangement for our pigs.

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Why we buy piglets rather than breeding our own; preparing for their arrival and minimizing the stress of their transition; what to feed them; a few thoughts on choosing heritage breeds versus modern breeds.

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Feeding ​the pigs, as they grow bigger, ​can ​easily degenerate into a full body contact sport in which the pig ​wins and the amateur pig-raiser ​gets discouraged and gives up on homegrown pork. Is there a way to keep pig-raising ​enjoyable when those cute little piglets are no longer cute?

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Electric fencing works very effectively for pigs, but only if they get the right first impressions of it. Here are the steps we take to train our piglets to stay behind electric fences, without terrifying them in the process.

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Household and personal care products
The bewildering array of products in the cleaning and personal care aisles of the supermarket are in my opinion almost entirely unnecessary.
They are an example of how entire industries can grow up on the back of a series of cleverly presented suggestions to the unsuspecting public that they need this particular thing – in spite of the fact that umpteen prior generations got along fine without it.
A staggering proportion of them are also poisonous to you, your family, and the ecosystems that produce your food and drinking water.
Actually, let me restate that: almost all of them, not just a proportion, are poisonous. The only thing that varies is the degree to which they are poisonous.
Even a brief exploration into what their ingredient lists actually mean, is mind boggling.
( I researched the term “toxicants” – defined as “toxic substances made by humans or introduced into the environment by humans” for an article once…
I started out trying to comprehend the stupefying array of toxic substances used in the manufacturing of items seen as necessary for every facet of modern life, and was unable to go the distance. I ended up abandoning the entire project.
I concluded that most of the products and items I looked at with toxic substances in them are unnecessary, and for those that aren’t, it’s just simpler and safer to grow or make your own, or buy from a small supplier you trust, who uses ingredients you can recognize.)
Back to the topic at hand. Simply stated, almost everything in the personal care and cleaning aisle of the supermarket is:

expensive,
wastefully packaged,
poisonous to varying degrees, and
largely unnecessary.

So why do we use them? Well, let’s see. We use them because:

Endlessly sophisticated marketing campaigns wash over us constantly, programming us to assume we need them
Our friends and peers use them, and we must keep up with the Joneses
There are not many channels for us to learn that we don't actually need most of them, that they are detrimental to our health and the health of our environment, and that it’s really not hard to make healthy, simple alternatives for the few we do need
What channels for this information do exist are not funded in the way that the campaigns encouraging us to buy are funded.

I avoid the bathroom and cleaning aisles in the supermarket as much as I possibly can, and I have a goal to boycott them completely.
That’s much better for our personal health, our family budget, the soils that grow our food, the air we breathe, the life in the oceans, and the water we drink.


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