Tag Archives forReal food tips and recipes

Herb Pesto (and Mulberry Milkshake)

Herb Pesto (and Mulberry Milkshake)

about a 4 minute read, lots of pics

Not that I have anything against basil, but pesto can be made with any edible green leaf or leaf combination. When all you see in your garden is edible leafy greens, pesto is a great way to serve up all that nutrition in a form that's easy and appealing to eat. In this post, I share my recent successful parsley pesto experiment.

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Farm Update: New Calf, Chickweed Salads, Veggie Harvest

Farm Update: New Calf, Chickweed Salads, Veggie Harvest

about a 4 minute read, lots of pics

The kids'll soon be up and looking for breakfast. The cow needs milking and the calf pen needs cleaning. I just have time before all that starts, to show you some pics of the new calf, our recent veggie garden harvests, and the chickweed in the lawn that we're putting into salads. 

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2 Ways to Preserve Leafy Greens From Your Veggie Garden

2 Ways to Preserve Leafy Greens From Your Veggie Garden


Text: about a 1 minute read. Lots of pictures.

In my experience, leafy greens are among the easiest kinds of veggies to grow. But they don't keep for very long and after you've given basketfuls of them to your friends and eaten stir-fried leafy greens, leafy greens in soups, in stews, and added to salads, and they're still coming, what do you do with them next?

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Okinawa Spinach

The green and purple leaves of okinawa spinach

Okinawa Spinach

About a 4-minute read, tips on growing and eating, lots of pics

Okinawa spinach is not a spinach at all, but a perennial leafy green.

The tops of the leaves are dark green with a striking purple underside. With frequent pruning (harvesting) it forms a handsome, dense, non-vining ground-cover.

You could landscape your front yard or your sidewalk with this plant and no-one need know, unless you tell them, that it’s edible and nutritious. The best part is that the more you eat it, the better it looks.  


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Homemade Ginger Sauerkraut

Growing Ginger + Making Sauerkraut
= Homemade Ginger Sauerkraut

Recipe + tips | Lots of pictures | About a 6 minute read
May '20, updated Nov '21

This post is about how the ginger growing in our garden has inspired successful homemade sauerkraut in our kitchen, and how that in turn has inspired better maintenance of the ginger plants in the garden. 

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How to Harvest and Use Queensland Arrowroot

How to Harvest and Use Queensland Arrowroot

Harvesting & Cooking tips | Lots of pictures | Short Tutorial Video | 4 minute read

Queensland arrowroot (Canna edulis) provides food for us, food for chickens, pigs, cattle and goats, mulch and/or compost material, and shelter for other plants. It's super easy to grow and to harvest and it self-propagates to a certain extent but is not weedy or invasive. And I think it looks beautiful. 

What more could a polyculture food grower ask?

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7 Easy Substitutes for When Lettuce Won’t Grow

​7 Easy Substitutes for When Lettuce Won't Grow

​​​5 - 6 minute read | Also published on PermacultureNews.org

​​Here are 6 ​plants that can withstand ​heat and high humidity without collapsing into sad little smears of slime, and that you can put in a salad ​without alienating your salad eaters.

​The 7th plant on the list, while very small in stature and not fitting the tropical perennial profile, none-the-less makes a super-sized contribution to the salad bowl.

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7 Ways to use the Humble Choko Vine

​7 Ways to use the Humble Choko Vine

​Approximately a ​4 minute read
Originally published Nov 6th, 2018, at PermacultureNews.org

Green choko fruit and leaf on vine

Chokos, plentifully displayed in baskets and crates at farmers markets in our area throughout the summer months, are boring, bland, and not very useful. 

That's what I used to think, but I've changed my mind.

This short article shares 7 of the ways I use chokos and choko vines since I gained a better appreciation for them.

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How Did Organ Meats Become “Offal” (Awful)?

How Did Organ Meats Become "Awful" (Offal)?

​(Approximately a 7 minute read)

​​​Organ meats were the animals' most precious gift to humanity.

Universally, in traditional cultures, organ meats were eaten first, with reverence, and often raw.

A family or community gathered around a carcass, gave thanks and honored the life of the animal, then ate the precious organs before processing the rest of the meat. Organ meats were the animals’ most nutritious, most powerful, gift to humanity.

In modern society, we tend to be repelled by the idea of eating organ meats. What happened?

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