Tag Archive

Tag Archives for " Real Food "

Food was once something that people shared. It is now a commodity.

Industrial food production has destroyed the health and interconnections between us and our food, food growers, and food growing ecosystems.

I define Real Food as food that repairs these broken connections, rebuilding health on all these levels.

Real Food does not come from Supermarkets: 6 Steps from Bare Ground to Homegrown Veggies

​Real Food does not come from Supermarkets - 6 Steps to Homegrown Veggies 

​Approximately a 6 ​minute read
Originally published July 1st, 2018, at PermacultureNews.Org

I imagine that when our grandchildren and great grandchildren read in history books about the supermarkets we relied ​on for food, they’ll wonder what we were thinking.  

My goal is to get to where our family can live without the supermarket entirely. There are many things we have yet to learn on this path; one of our major areas of focus right now is learning to grow more of our own vegies. ​

Recently, we ate our first ever homegrown cauliflower. This post shares how I got from "I don't think I could grow brassicas," to "Ooh look – a cauliflower!"  By the end of the article you’ll appreciate that if we can do it, anyone can.

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Ditching the Supermarket


Ditching the Supermarket

​Approximately an 8 to 10 minute read

​​​​​Usually when something seems too good to be true, there's a catch. The supermarket catch is a big one, and multifaceted.

The choice to shop at the supermarket really seems to be a no-brainer. You can get everything you need at one location, including a pre-packaged dinner.  You're back in the car before the kids get to melt-down stage, and it’s cheaper there than anywhere else. It seems too good to be true. 

In this article we’ll sniff out the real story behind the cheap convenience on the supermarket shelves.

We’ll look at the complex web of connections and consequences that attend our supermarket choices.

And we’ll uncover the reasons why reducing your dependence on supermarkets could be one of the most powerful things you’ll ever do to make a difference – for your own family’s health and for the health and resilience of your local community and the ecosystems you rely on.

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On Eating Meat

On Eating Meat

​(This post is approximately a 7 to 9 minute read.)

​​​"Happy meat" comes from animals raised in ecosystems, not cages, and ​​​never crowded or rushed.

We eat only happy meat – meat from our own animals that lived happy lives as part of a complete ecosystem, not in pens or cages, ​and without ​stress and tension ​caused by crowding, rushing, or inappropriate ​feeds ​or medications. 

Could you produce some of your own animal foods even if you don't live on acreage? 

What if you can't, or don't want, to raise your own animals? Can you still eat happy meat?

What if you've chosen a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle to care for animals and protect them from exploitation?

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How Did Organ Meats Become “Offal” (Awful)?

How Did Organ Meats Become "Awful" (Offal)?

​(Approximately a 7 minute read)

​​​Organ meats were the animals' most precious gift to humanity.

Universally, in traditional cultures, organ meats were eaten first, with reverence, and often raw.

A family or community gathered around a carcass, gave thanks and honored the life of the animal, then ate the precious organs before processing the rest of the meat. Organ meats were the animals’ most nutritious, most powerful, gift to humanity.

In modern society, we tend to be repelled by the idea of eating organ meats. What happened?

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Regenerative Farming and Gardening

​Regenerative Farming and Gardening

​(This post is just a 2 to 3 minute read)

​​Regenerative gardening and farming ​has an intention not just to feed ​people, but to leave the entire web of life stronger, richer, more complex and more resilient after our growing systems are in place, than​ it was before.

Growing food regeneratively means growing food in ecosystems, not mono-cultures. Biologically diverse, stable ecosystems that grow more vigorous and more bountiful with each passing season.

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